James I. Swenson Civil Engineering Building

Ross Barney Architect

Duluth, Minnesota

The James I. Swenson Civil Engineering Building not only celebrates the raw beauty of locally available

materials such as Cor-Ten steel, reclaimed taconite rocks, repurposed wood, and concrete, but does so in a way that creates teachable moments for the department’s 190 undergraduate students.The building is intended to be used both as a learning tool for the students and as a recruitment tool for the program. As such, structural bracing is left exposed and large bifold doors expose the high-bay spaces, both for moving objects in and out and for showing off experiments to prospective student. Most building systems are left exposed, including the structure, the wood-clad rain scuppers that penetrate the building envelope, and gabion walls filled with local taconite stone.Ross Barney Architects took extensive measures to reduce the amount of stormwater runoff (which could overwhelm the streams) and improve the quality of the water through natural groundwater recharge. Ultimately, 90 percent of the site’s average precipitation is captured and treated on site.

by architectmagazine.com

James I. Swenson Civil Engineering Building

Ross Barney Architect

James I. Swenson Civil Engineering Building

Ross Barney Architect

James I. Swenson Civil Engineering Building

Ross Barney Architect

Convent de Sant Francesc, Santpedor

David Closes

Santpedor (Catalonia), Spain

The Sant Francesc convent, located in the small Catalan town of Santpedor, was built in the early 18th century by Franciscan priests. In 1835 the convent was sacked. The project was aimed to convert the Church into an auditorium and a multifunctional cultural facility. The intervention has consolidated the church without deleting the process of deterioration and collapse that the building had suffered. Rather than reconstructing the church, the intervention has just consolidated the old fabric distinguishing clearly the new elements executed of the original ones.The intervention preserves the historical heritage of the building and simultaneously adds new values which highlight and singularize the ancient church in a contemporary way.


by dezeen.com

Convent de Sant Francesc, Santpedor

David Closes

Convent de Sant Francesc, Santpedor

David Closes

Convent de Sant Francesc, Santpedor

David Closes

Convent de Sant Francesc, Santpedor

David Closes

Naust paa Aure

TYIN tegnestue Architects

 Aure Kommune, More og Romsdal, Norway

The boathouse is a cultural and historical hallmark of Norways coastal regions, where fishing used to be the primary profession. They have traditionally been used for storing boats and fishing gear, but today many of them are being converted for recreational summer use. This particular boathouse is located on the outermost reaches of the Moere-coast, and it hails from the middle of the eighteenth century. It was in such a bad state that the owner decided to tear it down and build it anew. The simplicity of the old building, its good placement and honest use of materials would become key sources of inspiration for the design of the new building. Great emphasis was placed on the main construction, the gates of the gable wall and the adaptable long facade.An adaptable design approach and flexibility in the building process coupled with a high degree of presence on the work site have been crucial for the final result of this project. Rational choices in regards to material use, method of construction and detailing have given this boathouse its distinguished architectural features. The building remains true to the historical and cultural heritage of Norway’s coastal regions while catering to new modes of usage.

by http

‘naust paa aure’

TYIN tegnestue architects

‘naust paa aure’

TYIN tegnestue architects

'naust paa aure'

TYIN tegnestue architects

Hancock Mixed-Use Housing

Koning Eizenberg Architecture

West Hollywood, California

the completed Hancock Mixed-Use Housing complex includes 31 condominiums, seven units of affordable housing, 156 parking spaces, and more than 10,000 square feet of ground-floor retail on a busy corner in West Hollywood, Calif

The architects designed a cohesive building with a complex program that still gives a separate identity to each part: mangaris-wood slats for the condos; white vertical volumes for the townhouses; glass storefronts for the retail; and enclosed sidewalk patios for the affordable housing units. Parking is integrated into the building, with city-mandated spaces below grade and resident parking spaces on the second floor.

Each of the two-bedroom units along Santa Monica Boulevard is equipped with a sliding wood screen that moves along the balcony rail. The screen can be used to modulate the amount of direct sunlight reaching the living area, or to create an enclosed outdoor space, sheltering the deck from the busy thoroughfare. Flexible interior spaces can be programmed multiple ways, depending on the needs of the owner. “We were thinking about how people cohabit and thinking through different lifestyle scenarios,” explains principal Julie Eizenberg. “You could use [the space] as a living room or as a live/work office. There is no right way.”

By: Katie Gerfen  

Hancock Mixed-Use Housing

Koning Eizenberg Architecture

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